Sweat App: Why I Spent $120 On An iPhone Workout Subscription

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I’m a sucker for a sale. So when I signed up for a free trial of Kayla Itsines’ Sweat app and it offered me a year at half price, it took very little more to get me to click “buy.”

Truth be told, I’d been mulling it over since Sweat launched in 2015. I had downloaded the PDF version of Kayla’s BBG workouts and didn’t understand why I should pony up for an annual subscription to something I already owned. Two years later, my body was burned out on BBG. My muscles were tight, I was constantly tired, and the seven-minute circuits had become tedious. It was time for a change.

As much as I wanted a new program, I don’t have the flexibility to build my life around classes and I don’t want to pony up for a personal trainer. I’d been following Kelsey Wells on Instagram and I loved her body-positive outlook and emphasis on strength training. So when she launched her PWR program via the Sweat app, I decided to take a second look at it. Which is how I ended up sitting in my car outside the gym agreeing to pay $120 annually for workouts on my iPhone.

A white-hot wave of buyer’s remorse washed over me almost immediately. What had I done? I don’t normally spend that much on shoes, let alone an iPhone app! I hadn’t even tried these workouts and I already owned both BBG PDFs! The only way to make this worth the money is to use it, I thought.

Three months later, I’m convinced I made the right call after all. Here’s why.

It’s Shockingly Cost-Effective

The cost of workout classes has gotten out of control. Where I live, the average is about $35 a pop. So by using the Sweat app instead, I’m getting a year’s worth of workouts for the cost of about four classes. I do still pop into SoulCycle here and there on LISS days, but mostly I’m on the app. No matter how I add it up, the math works out in my favor.

Portability

As someone who spends a lot of time traveling, I need a workout I can take everywhere. With BBG via PDF, all I had to do was unlock my iPhone to view my daily workout plan. The Sweat app offers the same convenience, but with some extra bells and whistles. It has a LISS timer and tracker that works with Apple Health to tell you how far you’ve run, and how long you’ve worked out. It also has an air horn that blasts every time you’ve finished a circuit, so you don’t have to worry about setting your timer every time you start your reps.

Fresh Content

Knowing that the Sweat app will continue to grow its content is what truly has me hooked. I was about halfway through PWR when Kelsey Wells announced PWR 2.0. What awesome timing! It was such a nice surprise to be able to grow along with the app.

You can also try workouts from other trainers even if you’ve dedicated yourself to a certain program. For example, I’m currently doing PWR, but I’m finding myself craving one of Kayla Itsines’ leg workouts. I still have access to her entire program and can substitute whenever I feel like it.

Ease Of Use

Just choose your plan and click “start.” It’s that easy! The app tracks which week you’re on and gives you the latest round of workouts to insure that you’re challenged as your trainer of choice intended.

The workouts progress in real time, so there’s no need to toggle between pages to see what’s next. It also gives you enough time between exercises to set up your equipment and waits for your prompt to move ahead.

Integrated Playlists

Sweat app trainers have created custom playlists to accompany their workouts which you can access from within the app’s music feature. It also allows you to scroll through your own music library without leaving the app, which helps keep you focused.

Room For Imperfection

The app will keep progressing through the workout plan even if you’ve missed four sessions, or four weeks. While that means you can progress without remaining perfectly on point, that also means you can end up overdoing it. When I do need to take a break, I like to walk the app back to where I left off. Just tap the profile icon in the upper righthand corner. If you click “Manage My Program,” you can return to the point where you left off.

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